What’s Happening in Space Policy November 4-10, 2018

What’s Happening in Space Policy November 4-10, 2018

Here is SpacePolicyOnline.com’s list of space policy events for the week of November 4-10, 2018 and any insight we can offer about them.  The House and Senate are in recess (except for pro forma sessions) until after the elections.

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Roscosmos Releases Dramatic Video of Soyuz MS-10 Launch Failure, Confirms December 3 for MS-11

Roscosmos Releases Dramatic Video of Soyuz MS-10 Launch Failure, Confirms December 3 for MS-11

Russia’s Roscosmos space agency today released dramatic video of the October 11 Soyuz MS-10 launch failure and confirmed that it was caused by a malfunctioning sensor.  It also confirmed that the next International Space Station (ISS) crew, Soyuz MS-11, will launch on December 3, earlier than originally planned.

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Krikalev: Next Crew Could Launch to ISS on December 3

Krikalev: Next Crew Could Launch to ISS on December 3

Russian space agency official Sergei Krikalev told a Russian audience today that the Soyuz MS-10 launch failure was caused by a malfunctioning sensor and the next crew may launch to ISS on December 3.  His remarks were reported by Russia’s official news agency, TASS, which also said Roscosmos has set November 16 as the date for the launch of the next Russian cargo resupply mission, Progress MS-10.

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Kepler’s Kaput, But Exoplanet Discoveries Are Only Just Beginning

Kepler’s Kaput, But Exoplanet Discoveries Are Only Just Beginning

NASA’s renowned planet-hunting Kepler space telescope has reached the end of its lifetime.  It has run out of fuel and no longer can point itself at stars to determine if planets are in orbit around them (exoplanets).  The announcement comes as no surprise.  Kepler worked more than twice as long as expected, revolutionizing scientific understanding of planetary system formation along the way.  Scientists will continue to study the data it returned and from newer spacecraft.

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Today’s Tidbits: October 29, 2018

Today’s Tidbits: October 29, 2018

Here are SpacePolicyOnline.com’s tidbits for October 29, 2018:  Epps not sure why she was bumped from ISS mission; Hubble back in business; ESA ministers endorse future vision. Be sure to check our website for feature stories and follow us on Twitter (@SpcPlcyOnline) for more news and live tweeting of events.

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What’s Happening in Space Policy October 28-November 3, 2018

What’s Happening in Space Policy October 28-November 3, 2018

Here is SpacePolicyOnline.com’s list of space policy events for the week of October 28-November 3, 2018 and any insight we can offer about them.  The House and Senate are in recess (except for pro forma sessions) until after the elections.

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Bridenstine Reiterates December Launch to ISS on Track, and Other Space Council Tidbits

Bridenstine Reiterates December Launch to ISS on Track, and Other Space Council Tidbits

As we reported, yesterday’s Space Council meeting focused on the Space Force, but other topics were discussed as well.  Here are some tidbits from Space Council members NASA Administrator Jim Bridenstine and Secretary of Transportation Elaine Chao, representatives from the Department of Commerce and Department of State, and the chairman of the Council’s Users’ Advisory Group.

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DOD “Moving Out” on Space Force As Space Council Approves Six Recommendations to President

DOD “Moving Out” on Space Force As Space Council Approves Six Recommendations to President

Deputy Secretary of Defense Patrick Shanahan told the White House National Space Council today that DOD is “moving out” on the Space Force.  Shortly thereafter, the Council unanimously approved six recommendations to the President offered by Shanahan to take the next steps forward. The Trump Administration’s goal is to create a sixth military service, the Department of the Space Force, by 2020.

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Hubble’s Feeling Better, JWST Making Progress

Hubble’s Feeling Better, JWST Making Progress

It is not back to normal operations yet, but NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope is on the road to recovery.  The legendary telescope needs three gyroscopes to point it in the right direction to study the universe, but only two are working right now. Engineers have made progress in getting a balky third gyro back in operation, though they want to do a few more tests before Hubble resumes scientific observations. Meanwhile, progress is being made on Hubble’s successor, the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST), as NASA and Northrop Grumman deal with the latest cost overruns and schedule delay. [UPDATE, OCTOBER 27, 2018:  NASA just announced that Hubble resumed normal operations with three functioning gyros late yesterday and completed its first science operations (since October 5) at 2:10 am ET this morning.]

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What’s Happening in Space Policy October 21-27, 2018

What’s Happening in Space Policy October 21-27, 2018

Here is SpacePolicyOnline.com’s list of space policy events for the week of October 21-27, 2018 and any insight we can offer about them.  The House and Senate are in recess (except for pro forma sessions) until after the elections.

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