No 12 Percent Increase for NASA As House Appropriators Keep Agency At Current Funding Level

No 12 Percent Increase for NASA As House Appropriators Keep Agency At Current Funding Level

NASA’s request for a 12 percent increase in FY2021 to pay for getting people back on the Moon by 2024 was rejected by the House Appropriations Commerce-Justice-Science subcommittee today. The subcommittee’s recommendations were released this morning in advance of tomorrow’s markup. The agency is held to the same level as FY2020, $22.6 billion, instead of the $25.2 billion requested.

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What’s Happening in Space Policy July 5-11, 2020

What’s Happening in Space Policy July 5-11, 2020

Here is SpacePolicyOnline.com’s list of space policy events for the week of July 5-11, 2020 and any insight we can offer about them.  The House and Senate are in recess except for pro forma sessions until July 20, although House committees will be meeting throughout this period.

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House and Senate Make Progress on the FY2021 NDAA

House and Senate Make Progress on the FY2021 NDAA

The House and Senate both made progress on the FY2021 National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA) this week.  The House version cleared committee and the Senate got pretty far along debating its version on the floor.  The two chambers have now recessed for the July 4 holiday. Action will resume when they return.

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Commerce IG Slams Department Officials for Sharpiegate, Congress Wants Answers – UPDATED

Commerce IG Slams Department Officials for Sharpiegate, Congress Wants Answers – UPDATED

The Department of Commerce Inspector General has issued a harshly critical assessment of how Department officials handled Sharpiegate last year where NOAA rebuked the National Weather Service office in Birmingham, AL when it disagreed with a statement by President Trump about Hurricane Dorian. Only a summary was released, however, not the full report. In a separate memo today (July 1), Inspector General Peggy Gustafson expressed “deep concern” that the Department is preventing her office from completing its work. Two key members of Congress are demanding release of the full report. [Updated July 3 with additional statements from Sen. Cantwell and Rep. Johnson.]

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Today’s Tidbits: June 30, 2020

Today’s Tidbits: June 30, 2020

Here are SpacePolicyOnline.com’s tidbits for June 30, 2020: Mars Perseverance launch delayed to July 30; Russia to fly woman cosmonaut and allow space tourist to make a spacewalk; and people on the move.  Be sure to check our website for feature stories and follow us on Twitter (@SpcPlcyOnline) for more news and live tweeting of events.

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Space Force Unveils Organizational Structure

Space Force Unveils Organizational Structure

Gen. Jay Raymond, Chief of Space Operations for the U.S. Space Force (USSF), unveiled the USSF’s organizational structure today.  It will have three field commands and subordinate units designated  “deltas” and “squadrons.”  Activation of the new units will begin later this summer.

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NOAA Declares Commercial Weather Data Pilot Program a Success

NOAA Declares Commercial Weather Data Pilot Program a Success

Almost five years after Congress passed a law directing NOAA to initiate a pilot program to determine if commercial weather data could be incorporated into NOAA’s weather forecasting, the answer is back — yes.  After two rounds of contract awards to companies producing radio occultation data to improve weather forecasts, NOAA will soon issue a request for proposals for operational data and begin looking at other commercial technologies.

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What’s Happening in Space Policy June 28-July 4, 2020

What’s Happening in Space Policy June 28-July 4, 2020

Here is SpacePolicyOnline.com’s list of space policy events for the week of June 28-July 4, 2020 and any insight we can offer about them.  The House and Senate are in session this week.

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New Remote Sensing Regs Great Improvement, But Devil is in the Details

New Remote Sensing Regs Great Improvement, But Devil is in the Details

A three-day meeting of a NOAA advisory committee was full of praise for the new commercial remote sensing regulations published last month.  Yet speaker after speaker used the phrase “the devil is in the details” to characterize what comes next. Implementation can be the hardest part and some think legislation is needed.

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Campaign to Rename Stennis Space Center Kicks Off

Campaign to Rename Stennis Space Center Kicks Off

A campaign kicked off today to rename NASA’s Stennis Space Center as the deaths of George Floyd and other African Americans at the hands of law enforcement officers continue to raise societal awareness of racial disparities. Stennis is named after John C. Stennis (1901-1995), a segregationist U.S. Senator from Mississippi where the Center is located. Separately, NASA announced today it is naming its headquarters building after Mary Jackson, the first African American woman engineer to work at the agency.

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